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Technique

Armed for All Situations

How to Play Flawless Guitar Using the Military’s “Crawl, Walk, Run” Method

Nicholas Tozier gets this bout of informative inspiration from rigorous military training. Find out how the armed forces can improve your guitar playing.
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fingerstyle-1

Fingerstyle Guitar Lesson: Part Two

In the last finger picking lesson we looked at Travis picking. Here we're going to be sure your hand is equipped to do it correctly.
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1

Beginning Finger-style Guitar (Part One)

In this lesson, Ronnie Brooks shows us how to get started with finger-picking - can make a huge difference in your playing and improve your precision and dynamics
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String Skipping Fig. 2

An Introduction To String Skipping

If you think sweep picking is hard, you've never tried string skipping! Here's a little bit about string skipping, with a few exercises.
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Juggling Guitarists

Making Guitar Harder Than It Has To Be

Challenge is what makes us all grow. It's what keeps us coming back for more. What can over the top challenges do for your creativity and guitar playing?
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Jameson doing his morning warm up routine

Sweep Picking: The How Tos, What Fors, And Why Nots

Sweep picking is perhaps one of my favorite techniques to toy around with and among the most challenging skills to really nail down.
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C Major Chord

Simply Amazing: The Mechanics of Uncomplicated Guitar

Sometimes simplicity is divine. Not everything has to be difficult. This is also true when playing guitar. I have the most fun playing basic songs. Simple harmonies that everyone can easily identify with. They are fun to sing along with or just mess around.
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Guitar Chords Maj 7

Get More Mileage Out of the Barre and Jazz Chords You Already Know

Movable chord forms are great because they allow you to play in any key by moving them up and down the fretboard. "Movable" in this case just means "having no open strings." If you know a movable major chord, you could use that one form to play G major, Ab major, C# major, etc. Learning one movable chord form--and how to use it--is better than memorizing ten open chords.
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