Drive From New York

Electro-Harmonix is known for a great number of pedals over the last 40 plus years. From developing their own twists on modulation effects, fuzz and distortions, and expression pedals to more innovative and more experimental pedals like the Ravish Sitar and the 8 Step Program, the company has done well to offer a wide variety.

EHX East River DriveNow, as though the minds at EHX have reflected on all the aforementioned innovative pedals they’ve been cranking out, they’ve seemingly decided to take a step back and offer their own unique brand of wit on a classic. Now their long list of distortion and fuzz effects has a new addition. An overdrive.

Named after the river that divides Manhattan and Queens, as well as the road that travels alongside it, EHX has paid tribute to their own stomping grounds with the East River Drive overdrive pedal. This pedal was even made in New York City. It says so right on the front. Any more New Yorker and this pedal would talk like Regis Philben and be available in a bodega near you.

The East River Drive is based around the famous JRC4558 chip to get that classic symmetrical overdriven tone. As far as opinions go, I always thought if they did something like this it would have muff in the name somewhere, but East River Drive is probably more clever.

The Mechanics of the East River Drive

Anyway. The East River Drive is one of EHX’s minute nano pedals. The slim chassis takes up barely any pedal board real estate and there are three knobs to shape the signal. The volume knob will be used when deciding whether or not you want to wake up your neighbors when jamming at 3:00 AM. The drive knob will add or reduce gain from your signal so, when waking up your neighbors, you can decide how much grit you want to do so with. The tone knob will shape the timbre of your signal so when you do wake up your neighbors they will come over to your place and congratulate you on finding the perfect tone.

The East River Drive is more than willing to work in front of a clean amp or, if too much gain isn’t enough for your tastes, it can boost an already overdriven amp up beyond 11. Your signal will never be more grateful for the true bypass switching as well. This pedal also uses the standard 9 volt battery as well as the 9.6-Volt/DC200mA AC adapters. You know. In case the batteries have died and your neighbors still haven’t woken up.

Finally the East River Drive weighs in at a list price of $77.38 and is available at any EHX dealership.

Kyle Smitchens (448 Articles)

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.