Corey Taylor - Slipknot

Corey Taylor - Slipknot

Thoughts on Slipknot

Slipknot’s been big in the news since the untimely passing of Paul Gray and the amount of discussion about the future of the band has certainly made it challenging to not know what’s going on.

If you don’t know or care to relive Slipknot’s history then allow me to give you the abridged version.

Slipknot started way back when in 95 and became ragingly huge in 98 where the world was divided into two categories.  People that loved them and people that were sick of seeing them everywhere.

Me, I fit into the former category, which is why I’m writing this now.

Anyway, they got huge, and released several albums, started side projects, etc.  Then one year ago Paul Gray was found post mortem.

Now the band is working on a tour and the future of the band is questionable as there is little consistency between band members.

Not bad.  All you need to know about everything that’s important, right?

[stextbox id ="info" float="true" align="right" size="200px" caption="Read About Slipknot's Jim Root" bgcolor="ff9900" bgcolorto="ffffff" cbgcolor="000000"] [/stextbox]

Perspective

Ok, so my goal here isn’t to say what is or isn’t right, but rather to offer an objective perspective on some things.

Slipknot had certainly established a series of principles early on, the most notable ones being their views on the masks (specifically when and how it was acceptable to take them off) and no lineup changes.  But that was then and this is now where they have a DVD out with unmasked interviews and have a new bassist and potentially a new vocalist or bust.

This is all fine and dandy as it’s understandable that a group of nine people working together for over ten years will come to have different opinions.

Naturally the question is just how do you handle this?

Should they be expected to cling to the ideologies that were developed while they were still joe blows or should they be permitted elbow room for growing and changing opinions?

Interviews with Corey Taylor have implied that he’s not ready to commit to staying with or leaving the band until the tour’s done, but interviews with Joey Jordison have been a bit more blatant as he’s expressed his determination to continue the band, which he seems to view as his brain child, regardless of whomever decides to follow or not.

Couple that with a replaced band member and you’ve got a glaringly different vibe from the one that started the band.

Call me crazy, but it sounds like a recipe for disaster.

Me – I don’t really care much either way.  Something like this there is no right or wrong answer, so what do you do?

 

Kyle Smitchens (448 Articles)

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.