Gibson Les Paul Deluxe

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Gibson Les Paul Deluxe
Gibson Les Paul Deluxe
Gibson Les Paul Deluxe

So Gibson has revealed their newest addition to the already expansive Les Paul roster.  The Les Paul Deluxe.  So what attributes does this guitar model feature that earn it the lofty title I reserve for my pizzas?  Well let’s dive in and find out.

Of course it’s Gibson we’re talking about so there will be blatant similarities between this and pretty much every other Les Paul out there.

Mahogany set neck with a rosewood fretboard and a maple top glued onto a, as taken directly from their web site, “strategically chambered” body.

I’m going to side track for a moment to over analyze that.  Strategically chambered.  I like the idea of a group of designers in military uniform pushing plastic pieces with one of those little rake things across a Risk board formulating a strategy of their attack on this seemingly innocent piece of mahogany to hollow it out.

Anything?  Oh come on.  It wasn’t that not-funny.

Fine.  Moving on.

While it shares the core characteristics of Gibson’s standard choice of materials what sets this apart?  The pickups are the most noticeable in that they’re mini-humbuckers. The narrower coils are armed to the teeth with Alnico II magnets.  The result is a brighter pickup that hacks its way through the metaphorical Amazon jungle that is the whole band mix.

The output jack is also a Neutrick locking jack.  That ain’t your grandma’s output jack, so you know.  If you happen to prefer standing on your guitar cables while playing this will at least reduce the probability of pulling the cable out of the guitar.  Of course I suppose that heightens the probability of breaking the cable itself, though.  Haven’t tested it myself so who knows?

And just in case you didn’t think this guitar was unique enough as it is the truss rod cover even says “Deluxe” right on it.

All of this in the name of giving us an accurate replica of what Les Pauls were like back in the 70s when the use of the word “deluxe” was a lot more carefree.  They have even thrown in some cream binding as a friendly slap on the cheek before they send you on your way.

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Kyle Smitchens

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.

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