Halloween Guitar Series #6 (Final)

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Alrighty, everyone.  It’s Halloween and I’ve got one last gallery ready to rock.  Today’s gallery is pretty much a bunch of references to personal favorite movies.  While I couldn’t find a guitar for each top favorite I came pretty close.  Having said that let’s move on in for the kill.

Evil Dead is oddly a franchise I didn’t care much for when I first saw them, but with each viewing their ridiculous charm gets better and better every time.  I don’t know what everyone else is planning on for the next presidential election, but I plan on writing Bruce Campbell down on my ballot.  Then he’ll handle every situation with a chainsaw and that will be awesome.
While we’ve featured this guitar in some random top 11 about random stuff I’d done, it’s relevant enough to bust back out for the occasion.

The Thing is easily among my favorite movies as a whole, and probably my favorite horror movie.  Much like Evil Dead it gets better every time I see it largely because unlike that skidmark prequel that was just released John Carpenter built suspense from anticipation rather than splicing a big cartoon into the movie.  His use of lighting was remarkable as well with all the dense blues and reds from the ice and flares.

I  can’t make out the brand on the inside of the guitar and I don’t recognize the logo, so I don’t know who to credit as the manufacturer, but the artwork features the excellent work of Drew Struzan which was used as the cover of The Thing.  For the record I plan on putting Kurt Russell on the same ballot with Bruce Campbell for them to work as dual presidents.

Next up is King Kong.  The clasic of all classics.  The icon that sets the precedence for anything that is accused of being iconic.  This was also another movie that scared my mother when she was a kid, to which I laughed at her for.

The guitar is an indistinguishable Les Paul and the paint features the most memorable scene from the movie.  Kong up on the Empire State building.  And boy is it memorable.  It’s one of those movies you don’t even have to see to know that scene.  It’s like Thelma and Louise or Old Yeller, only better because King Kong has a giant gorilla smashing things while it’s at it.

Following that up I’ll land on the Saw double-guitar which belongs to double-guitar shredder Sonny Lombardozzi.  The guitar seen here is a custom made, double 8-string guitar, both necks fully scalloped, with 808 EMG pickups, and Kahler tremolos, and right front and center is Billy the puppet’s money maker, looking sharp.

The movies themselves are great, in my humbling opinion.  Not the most original thing out there, sure.  Dr. Phibes and Seven were laying the foundation for what would become Saw long ago, but as far as modern horror is concerned, I think the series is a breath of fresh air.

Lately the industry’s been hell bent on remaking or camouflaging remakes as prequels, and before that we had such blessings like I Know What You Did Last Summer.  I do think the first Saw movie was the best mostly because it didn’t need to show much at all to be effective.  Also some of the character development in later movies started to feel contrived.

Coming up next is Phantasm.  As I’d commented in yesterday’s article I used to hate horror movies, and Phantasm was a big reason why.  I was about 11 when I saw it and I was more horrified then than with any other movie I’d ever seen.  My father had rented it back then and I recently approached him asking why I was allowed to watch Phantasm, but I wasn’t allowed to watch Beavis and Butt-Head.  He told me he’d tell me when I grew up.

Yeah, that movie scared me more than any other movie, but now I watch it and I can’t get past how cheesy it is.  I love it, but damn it’s goofy.  The guitar that was used as a canvas for this movie is a custom Schecter.  The neck also features sphere with blade inlays much like the spheres from the movie.   The ones that tastefully drilled open hapless victims’ face-bones.

The Sleepy Hollow guitars are more so because I was just really fascinated with the guitars than anything else.  The Steinberger’s cold feeling and the double-neck mandolin-guitar’s I just thought were unique and plenty creative enough to include here.

And last but absolutely, positively not least is the “Manos” The Hands of Fate guitar.  A frequent competitor of Plan 9 from Outer Space for the prestigious title of the worst movie ever made “Manos” The Hands of Fate is easily my favorite crappy movie out there.  When the most memorable character is named Torgo you know you have a real gem on your hands.

Clearly I’m not the only one out there that thinks so because here we have a guitar that someone decided to use to pay tribute to “Manos”.  I imagine it’s some Strat knock off because I can’t imagine someone would reference that movie on an expensive guitar.

And with that we have our Halloween Guitar Series.   If you’ve all enjoyed them then awesome.  If not better luck next year.  Till then you all have a happy Halloween.


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Kyle Smitchens

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.

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