Jackson X Series GuitarWell, well, well.  Look at what the cat dragged in.

Jackson Guitars fairly recently announced a new line of guitars dubbed the X Series which includes their Dinky, SLS, Randy Rhoads, Warrior, Soloist, and King V models.

So what makes this line of guitars stand out from their others?

For starters all the guitars of the X Series are built of basswood and each one has a neck-through maple neck with a rosewood finger board slapped on each one of these bad boys which goes up to 24 frets so you can go a little crazy on those higher frets like we know you do.

However the pickups are not consistent from one model to another. The Dinky DKXT and King V KVXT come stock with a set of passive EMG humbuckers with an HZ-H4-AN at the neck and an HZ-H4-B at the bridge.  The Warrior WRXMG and Soloist SLSXMG both share the same EMG active humbuckers with an 85 at the neck and an 81 at the bridge.  The Randy Rhoads RRXT and the Soloist SLX have matching Seymour Duncan alnico humbuckers with an HB102N at the neck and an HB102B at the bridge.

Speaking of bridges both Soloist models feature a Floyd Rose double-locking tremolo where other models feature a TonePros bridge strung up through the body.

And now for that little characteristic that has more of an impact on tone than any other aspect. The paint.  Each model has its own little selection of colors giving you your own pick of the littler.  The Dinky can come in black, snow white, or transparent red.  The Soloist SLSXMG can be found with a natural finish, gun metal gray, or snow white.  The Rhoads is available in black, kawasabi green, or transparent black.  The Warrior is can be purchased in black or quicksilver.  The Soloist SLX can be snared in black, kawasabi green, natural, or snow white finishes as well, and the King V comes in burnt cherry sunburst, black, black with blood red bevels, and quicksilver.

As a bonus all models are quite affordable going as low as $450. Some of the pricier models, the Warrior for example, can get you up to $700, so that statement depends on how relative your interpretation of affordable is to what’s in your bank account.  Most models don’t exceed $500, though.

Recently we swung by our neighboring parallel universe and spoke with a certain Steve Vai who still plays Jackson.  When asked about this new series he commented, “they’re pretty damn cool.”

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Kyle Smitchens (448 Articles)

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.