PRS Presents the \m/ Metal Pickups

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PRS \m/ Metal

Can a Better Name for Metal Pickups Exist?

PRS \m/ MetalHave you been searching for a new alternative to enhance your guitar and give it a stronger metal tone? You know. Something that can take all the gain you can give it like a sadist and pump out chunky riffs mired in bass or screaming treble driven leads. The hive mind of engineers at Paul Reed Smith have answered this call with their new passive \m/ Metal pickups.

I’m still not entirely certain how to pronounce the model name. Slash m Slash? Backslash m forward slash? Horns? Ah, what’s it matter?  By now it’s been labeled Metal and the point is PRS has engineered humbuckers to get powerful pickup that can handle about as much gain as you can saturate your signal with while not sacrificing a crisp clean tone. Those stock pickups installed in your First Act aren’t going to get you that grinding metal tone that will pierce your skull like a drill. But a PRS Metal will, as any pickup named \m/ should.

So let’s take a deeper look into this newly discovered specimen of the wild.

The Specs

Firstly there are two distinct models of the Metal humbuckers. A treble model and a bass model. While they mostly share similarities there are a few differences to give each an edge the other cannot readily compensate for allowing you to cover about any range of frequency you’re looking to meld into your sound.

The treble model, better known as the ACC-3408, is a ceramic pickup, compatible with 3-way and 5-way pickup selectors. Keeping up with the modern trends in guitar electronics this pickup is read for coil-tapping. Plus getting it its treble is a DC resistance of 15.7k.

Contrasting the treble model is the bass humbucker, or the ACC-3409. As I’d said earlier they’re nearly identical. That means this version is also ceramic, it can be set up for a 3-way and a 5-way pickup selector, and it’s completely coil-tappable. The main difference is the DC resistance. This one has nearly half the resistance as the treble model with only 8.5k. That means you’re going to get a rich bassy tone.

If I may deviate from the primary subject matter for a second. Just to give those that aren’t overly savvy with pickup terminology the DC resistance more or less gives us an idea of how many windings go around the coils in the pickups. The number of windings plus the size of the wires and the amount of times they can wind around the coil act as a few of the variables that help shape how the pickups react to the generated voltage and ultimately your tone.

Both models are available in matching gloss nickel covers and can currently be purchased through select PRS dealers or through PRS’ online guitar part store. Each model runs a fee of $199.  You can find out more at PRS’ web site.

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Kyle Smitchens

Kyle Smitchens is the Guitar-Muse Managing Editor, super hero extraordinaire, and all around great guy. He has been playing guitar since his late teens and writing personal biographies almost as long. An appreciator of all music, his biggest influences include Tchaikovsky, Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Steve Vai, Therion, and Jon Levasseur of Cryptopsy.

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