Webstrings - Guitar StringsWhen you find a great deal on something you’re using every day, it’s really tempting to to want to try it – but as you’ve probably discovered, most things in life that seem too good to be true, are too good to be true.

That’s not the case with Webstrings. I’ve used their strings plenty of times, and I’ve found the quality and sound to be about the same as most low-mid range branded strings (D’Addario, GHS, etc.)

Who makes Webstrings?

According to their website, it’s the same manufacturers that make a lot of the strings you use anyway. They say there are only a few factories that make all the guitar strings that we see on the market. Webstrings contacts the American manufacturers that make most of the really popular string brands and orders some quantity of them, and packages them efficiently.

They don’t spend any money on advertising, and they sell direct to the customer – as opposed to the usual model of Manufacturer -> Brand -> Distributor -> Store – where everyone at each step is making money.

On the website, they mention D’Addario, GHS, and Ernie Ball, but they don’t say specifically that these are the same strings, it’s more used as an example.

Are they Bulk Strings?

If you’ve ordered bulk strings in the past, you know it can be kind of a pain – you might get a bag of 20 high E strings, and they’re not packaged well, or they’re all tangled up. Webstrings packages the strings just like the ones you’re used to, only they put two strings per paper envelope, so there are 3 envelopes in a standard set of guitar strings.

What do they sound and feel like?

Of the 10 or so sets I’ve used (both bass and guitar strings) I’ve found that there is no difference in sound when compared to the brands above – none at all.

They come sounding bright, and stay that way for about a month for guitar strings, and longer for bass strings. The decline in brightness is very slow – you could probably get two months out of these strings on a guitar, and I’ve easily done 6 months on the bass strings. But at this price – there’s no sense in waiting to change them out – unless you really really want to save some money!

The feel is the same on these strings as their more expensive cousins. I don’t notice a difference.

How is the shipping?

The shipping is fast – pretty much standard. You’ll get them in about a week. You’ll pay $6 roughly for shipping, and if you order $80 or more (That’s about 26 sets of guitar strings) you’ll get free shipping – if you’re in the US.

Some Pricing Examples

  • If you bought one set, you’d pay about $9 (that’s with the $5.50 shipping.)
  • If you bought two sets, you’d pay about $12 (after shipping) – about $6 a set.
  • There are discounts for anything over 11 sets so if you bought 12 sets, you’d pay about $41 – $3.41 a set.
  • If you bought 24 sets, you’d pay about $71 – Just under $3.00 a set.
  • If you bought 36 sets, you’d qualify for free shipping (over $80), so that would be about $98 – $2.73 a set.

What kind of strings do they have available?

They have pretty much everything. I’ve used the electric strings and bass strings, but they’ve also got 7 string options, 12 string options, acoustic strings, classical strings, banjo strings, flatwounds, and more. Within the “electric” category, there are 14 options for different styles and string gauges.

How is the customer service?

I had a pretty good experience with their customer service. I accidentally entered the wrong address (actually it was a PayPal thing) when I made my first order, and I immediately sent their customer service an email. The next morning, I had a response from them (basically “No problem”), and my strings arrived less than a week later – to the correct address.

Overall

I’d say give them a try. You can’t really lose, in my opinion. I don’t use Webstrings exclusively, but I do buy from them frequently. I’ve gigged with them, and I’ve recorded with them. When I run out and need a quick set of strings, I’ll still go to the guitar store and pay two to four times as much, but when I’ve planned ahead there are always some Webstrings around.

Of course you can find Webstrings at Webstrings.com

 

Tim Monaghan (131 Articles)

Tim has been playing guitar & bass since he was 12 years old and has been in Jazz, funk, rock & metal bands. Influences include Jeff Beck, Stanley Clarke, Doug Stegmeyer, Baden Powell, Steve Vai, and pretty much anyone else who has a unique style that expresses their individuality. One of Tim’s many hobbies is building, tweaking, and repairing basses and guitars.